Tammuz By Hoku Lani – Non-Fiction

Writer: Hoku Lani

Subject: Tammuz

Link: MEWE / 20.02.2021 / Hoku Lani

Tammuz

The festival for the deity Tammuz was held throughout the month of Tammuz in midsummer, and celebrated his death and resurrection.The first day of the month of Tammuz was the day of the new moon of the summer solstice. On the second day of the month, there was lamentation over the death of Tammuz, on the 9th, 16th and 17th days torchlit processions, and on the last three days, an image of Tammuz was buried.

Another interesting festival is the marriage one.

The cult of Tammuz centered around two yearly festivals, one celebrating his marriage to the goddess Inanna, the other lamenting his death at the hands of demons from the netherworld. During the 3rd dynasty of Ur (c. 2112 — c. 2004 BC) in the city of Umma (modern Tell Jokha), the marriage of the god was dramatically celebrated in February — March, Umma’s Month of the Festival of Tammuz. The celebrations in March — April that marked the death of the god also seem to have been dramatically performed. Many of the laments for the occasion have as a setting a procession out into the desert to the fold of the slain god. (ibid. Emphasis ours.)

What does the worship of Tammuz have to do with the sign of the cross? According to historian Alexander Hislop, Tammuz was intimately associated with the Babylonian mystery religions begun by the worship of Nimrod, Semiramis, and her illegitimate son, Horus. The original form of the Babylonian mystery religions begun by the worship of Nimrod, Semiramis, and her illegitimate son, Horus. The original form of the Babylonian letter T was † (tau), identical to the crosses used today in this world’s Christianity.

This was the initial of Tammuz. Referring to this sign of Tammuz, Hislop writes:

That mystic Tau was marked in baptism on the foreheads of those initiated into the Mysteries. The Vestal virgins of Pagan Rome wore it suspended from their necklaces, as the nuns do now. There is hardly a Pagan tribe where the cross has not been found.

3 thoughts on “Tammuz By Hoku Lani – Non-Fiction”

  1. Thank You
    Hoku Lani
    For sharing your knowledge
    I learn so much by reading your words
    You obviously put a lot of effort into your writings.
    I appreciate you
    Hail Lilith
    Thank You Xpanther for presenting her work

  2. The only thing I need to fucking know about the Xtian Cross is where it is so I can jerk-off all over it. The only Cross I recognize is inverted; HAIL FUCKING FATHER SATAN.

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